Archive for category Tools

Tweeting in 2016

Twitter identifies my top tweet, my top mention and my top media tweet. My followers appear to be most interested in globalised online learning.

Top tweets 2016

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CALRG: Computers and Learning Research Group

Building Knowledge seminar slide

Building Knowledge seminar slide. Credits: https://xkcd.com/1478/ and https://xkcd.com/552/

Along with colleagues – Liz Fitzgerald, Janesh Sanzgiri, Jenna Mittelmeier – I am responsible for organising weekly meetings of the Computers and Learning Research Group (CALRG). The group brings together research staff and doctoral students within our department, as well as people from other areas of the university who have similar research interests.

We have established a pattern of events that continues throughout the year, with breaks where necessary for major events and holidays.

First Thursday: CALRG Seminar Regular slot for internal and external speakers to share and discuss their research.

Second Thursday: Reading Group Discussing key papers in the area from the past and the present. The contents of this forthcoming book help us to identify ‘must-read’ papers. In the autumn, Janesh and Jenna will be running short sessions before the reading group in order to give new doctoral students the confidence to share their views.

Third Thursday: Building Knowledge Seminar An opportunity for us to share our expertise by talking about our research, introducing methods and discussing new opportunities. At a recent session on writing up quantitative and qualitative research, I introduced ways of presenting and evaluating these types of research and then group members discussed how they had done this themselves, and the challenges they had faced.

Fourth Thursday: Cake Drop! An informal session. Chat to your colleagues and enjoy cake. Mmm.

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1000 citations and counting

1002 citations according to Google Scholar, and  20,548 downloads from the university’s Open Research Online repository (ORO).
citation count - 1002 citations

Update on 3 January 2016 from Google Scholar. 27,672 ORO downloads.

Screen Shot 2016-01-03 at 19.23.08

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Publication statistics

ORO download statistics

ORO download statistics

According to the latest set of Open Research Online (ORO) figures, I now have 15,391 total downloads. This makes me the 46th most downloaded researcher of the thousands on the OU system.

Checking back in my blog, my work had been downloaded 8,780 times last March. The change in the figures suggests my work is downloaded from ORO 80 times a day on average. This seems surprisingly high, and underlines the benefits of having research easily searchable and downloadable online.

Meanwhile, over on Google Scholar, all this downloading activity translates into 768 citations to date, or one citation for every 20 downloads. That rate has remained steady since March. I’m also surprised at that consistency – I would have expected the rate to vary because the download numbers are so very different.

I’m pleased to see that my thesis has now been downloaded 912 times. Open access makes it so much more easy to open doctoral research up to the world instead of leaving it languishing on the shelves of the author’s family.

Update on 3 January 2016

I now have 27,672 downloads on ORO – that’s 12,281 in the past 363 days or about 34 downloads a day over the last year. I have 1261 citations on Google Scholar – that’s one citation for every 22 ORO downloads.

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My top 10 social media tools (2011)

Over on Tumblr I have been running a screenshot-a-day project for a couple of years. I layer screenshots upon each other, with an image to represent each day, placed on top of previous images. This functions as a semi-public (open, but not publicised) diary. It also, consciously, forms a record of the online tools I use, and of my digital experience. Sometimes I include a whole-screen shot, showing my applications bar and all open windows, at other times I go for a single image.

This week, I have been looking at the text from 2011, pulling it together in diary format. Wordle revealed my top ten tools, as mentioned in my text, for 2011 (As I was working on SocialLearn, I have excluded it from the list – it would have come in at number 6). The majority are social media, others I use as social media by sharing them via Slideshare (PowerPoints) and Tumblr (screenshots):

  1. Google (31 mentions)
  2. Facebook (20 mentions)
  3. Twitter (19 mentions)
  4. Email   (16 mentions)
  5. Screenshot facility (12 mentions)
  6. SecondLife (12 mentions)
  7. Blog (11 mentions)
  8. PowerPoint (11 mentions)
  9. Tumblr (8 mentions)
  10. Cloudworks and YouTube (7 mentions)screenshot a day

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Slideshare stats

Slideshare emailSlideshare emailed me recently to point out that my presentations have had 10,000 views.

It’s difficult to know how seriously to take this figure – after all, many of these ‘views’ may be people or bots browsing through and not reading anything. Perhaps more meaningful is the fact that I have currently had my presentations and documents downloaded 117 times. The reality probably lies somewhere between the two – but 117 to 10,000 is a very wide ballpark. Compared with publication in a journal with an impact factor of 1 or 2, though, either one is looking good.

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Widgets to support awareness and reflection

Workshop activityAt the 1st Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Personal Learning Environments, run in conjunction with the PLE Conference 2011, I presented our work on EnquiryBlogger.

Ferguson, Rebecca; Buckingham Shum, Simon and Deakin Crick, Ruth (2011). EnquiryBlogger: using widgets to support awareness and reflection in a PLE Setting. In: 1st Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Personal Learning Environments. In conjunction with the PLE Conference 2011, 11-13 July 2011, Southampton, UK.

Abstract

Blogs provide environments within which people can articulate, refine and reflect on practice. These characteristics make them useful for learners who are developing the practical skills and learning dispositions that are associated with authentic enquiry. The EnquiryBlogger tool is being developed to extend the core features of a robust, open source blogging platform in order to support awareness and reflection for enquiry-based learners. The first phase of the project developed blog plug-ins, together with associated teacher dashboards, and piloted their use. Feedback and use data show that the tools support reflection and are valued by learners. The pilot study has informed the development of a second phase of the project, which will support customization of these tools and increase learners’ opportunities to develop awareness of the experiences of others.

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