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Innovating pedagogy: China

The Innovating Pedagogy 2016 report. Now in Chinese.

First page in Chinese

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Dimensions of personalisation in TEL

Tweet about the paperNew paper out in the British Journal of Educational Technology, co-authored with a host of people. Lead author Liz FitzGerald plus Natalia Kucirkova, Ann Jones, Simon Cross, Thea Herodotou, Garron Hillaire and Eileen Scanlon.

The framework proposed in the paper has six dimensions:

  1. what is being personalised
  2. type of learning
  3. personal characteristics of the learner
  4. who/what is doing the personalisation
  5. how personalisation is carried out
  6. impact / beneficiaries

Abstract

Personalisation of learning is a recurring trend in our society, referred to in government speeches, popular media, conference and research papers and technological innovations. This latter aspect – of using personalisation in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) – has promised much but has not always lived up to the claims made. Personalisation is often perceived to be a positive phenomenon, but it is often difficult to know how to implement it effectively within educational technology.

In order to address this problem, we propose a framework for the analysis and creation of personalised TEL. This article outlines and explains this framework with examples from a series of case studies. The framework serves as a valuable resource in order to change or consolidate existing practice and suggests design guidelines for effective implementations of future personalised TEL.

FitzGerald, Elizabeth; Kucirkova, Natalia; Jones, Ann; Cross, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca; Herodotou, Christothea; Hillaire, Garron and Scanlon, Eileen (2017). Dimensions of personalisation in technology-enhanced learning: a framework and implications for design. British Journal of Educational Technology (early view).

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MOOCs: What the UK research tells us

report coverOur latest quality enhancement report, MOOCs; What the Research of FutureLearn’s UK Partners Tells Us came out in late January 2017. The rport was co-authored with Tim Coughlan, Christothea Herodotou and Eileen Scanlon. It follows an earlier report on what MOOC research from The Open University tells us.

The report provides brief summaries of, and links to, all accessible publications stored in the repositories of  FutureLearn’s UK academic partners that deal with research on MOOCs. Where these publications made recommendations that could be taken up, these recommendations are highlighted within the report. Full references for all studies are provided in the bibliography.

Studies are divided thematically, and the report contains sections on MOOCs as a field, pedagogy and teaching, accessibility, retention, motivation and engagement, assessment and accreditation, study skills, MOOCs around the world, and sustainability.

The report contains 59 recommendations that have emerged from the publications and each of these is linked to the research study that generated it.

MOOC priority areas

1. Develop a strategic approach to learning at scale.

2. Develop appropriate pedagogy for learning at scale.

3. Identify and share effective learning designs.

4. Support discussion more effectively.

5. Clarify learner expectations.

6. Develop educator teams.

7. Widen access.

8. Develop new approaches to assessment and accreditation.

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Research Evidence on the Use of Learning Analytics: Implications for Education Policy

Report coverThe final report on our study of learning analytics for European educational policy (LAEP) is now out.

Research Evidence on the Use of Learning Analytics: Implications for Education Policy brings together the findings of a literature review; case studies; an inventory of tools, policies and practices; and an expert workshop.

The report also provides an Action List for policymakers, practitioners, researchers and industry members to guide work in Europe.

Learning Analytics: Action List

Policy leadership and governance practices

  • Develop common visions of learning analytics that address strategic objectives and priorities
  • Develop a roadmap for learning analytics within Europe
  • Align learning analytics work with different sectors of education
  • Develop frameworks that enable the development of analytics
  • Assign responsibility for the development of learning analytics within Europe
  • Continuously work on reaching common understanding and developing new priorities

Institutional leadership and governance practices

  • Create organisational structures to support the use of learning analytics and help educational leaders to implement these changes
  • Develop practices that are appropriate to different contexts
  • Develop and employ ethical standards, including data protection

Collaboration and networking

  • Identify and build on work in related areas and other countries
  • Engage stakeholders throughout the process to create learning analytics that have useful features
  • Support collaboration with commercial organisations

Teaching and learning practices

  • Develop learning analytics that makes good use of pedagogy
  • Align analytics with assessment practices

Quality assessment and assurance practices

  • Develop a robust quality assurance process to ensure the validity and reliability of tools
  • Develop evaluation checklists for learning analytics tools

Capacity building

  • Identify the skills required in different areas
  • Train and support researchers and developers to work in this field
  • Train and support educators to use analytics to support achievement

Infrastructure

  • Develop technologies that enable development of analytics
  • Adapt and employ interoperability standards

Other resources related to the LAEP project – including the LAEP Inventory of learning analytics tools, policies and practices – are available on Cloudworks.

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Developing a strategic approach to MOOCs

german-refOur introductory article for the JIME special issue on MOOCs focused on the research work carried out in the area by UK universities who are FutureLearn partners.

‘Developing a strategic approach to MOOCs’ uses the work carried out at these universities to identify nine priority areas for MOOC research and how these can be developed in the future:

  1. Develop a strategic approach to MOOCs.
  2. Expand the benefits of teaching and learning in MOOCs.
  3. Offer well-designed assessment and accreditation.
  4. Widen participation and extend access.
  5. Develop and make effective use of appropriate pedagogies.
  6. Support the development of educators.
  7. Make effective use of learning design.
  8. Develop methods of quality assurance.
  9. Address issues related to privacy and ethics.

Ferguson, Rebecca; Scanlon, Eileen and Harris, Lisa (2016). Developing a strategic approach to MOOCs. Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 2016(1), article no. 21.

Abstract

During the last eight years, interest in massive open online courses (MOOCs) has grown fast and continuously worldwide. Universities that had never engaged with open or online learning have begun to run courses in these new environments. Millions of learners have joined these courses, many of them new to learning at this level. Amid all this learning and teaching activity, researchers have been busy investigating different aspects of this new phenomenon. In this contribution we look at one substantial body of work, publications on MOOCs that were produced at the 29 UK universities connected to the FutureLearn MOOC platform. Bringing these papers together, and considering them as a body of related work, reveals a set of nine priority areas for MOOC research and development. We suggest that these priority areas could be used to develop a strategic approach to learning at scale. We also show how the papers in this special issue align with these priority areas, forming a basis for future work.

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Researching MOOCs: JIME special issue

I was one of the editors of a special issue of the Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JIME) on Researching MOOCs. The special issue draws on the work of the FutureLearn Academic Network (FLAN), which is made up of academics st universities that are FutureLearn partners.

Other editors were Eileen Scanlon (The Open University) and Lisa Harris (University of Southampton).

The special issue contains five papers.

Contents page

 

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Innovating Pedagogy 2016

Great to see this year’s Innovating Pedagogy 2016 report out. This report, which I co-author with others at The Open University, highlights ten trends that will impact education over the next decade. These include Design Thinking, Productive Failure, Formative Analytics and Translanguaging. The report also presents evidence to inform decisions about which pedagogies to adopt. The pedagogies range from ones already being tested in classrooms, such as learning through video games, to ideas for the future, like adapting blockchain technology for trading educational reputation.
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This year, the report has been written in collaboration with the Learning Sciences Lab, National Institute of Education, Singapore.

The ten trends covered this year are:

  1. Learning through social media: Using social media to offer long-term learning opportunities
  2. Productive failure: Drawing on experience to gain deeper understanding
  3. Teachback: Learning by explaining what we have been taught
  4. Design thinking: Applying design methods in order to solve problems
  5. Learning from the crowd: Using the public as a source of knowledge and opinion
  6. Learning through video games: Making learning fun, interactive and stimulating
  7. Formative analytics: Developing analytics that help learners to reflect and improve
  8. Learning for the future: Preparing students for work and life in an unpredictable future
  9. Translanguaging: Enriching learning through the use of multiple languages
  10. Blockchain for learning: Storing, validating and trading educational reputation

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