Archive for category Educational Futures

OpenTEL and innovation

On 9 May I talked about the Innovating Pedagogy reports to the OpenTEL group at The Open University. My talk focused on six pedagogies that we have covered in the reports, and how these might be used within the university.

For example, the flipped classroom provides a way of preparing students for field trips, residential school, tutorials and forum discussions. Computational thinking is a skill that could be covered in different disciplines and at different levels, as well as included in the professional development of staff. Spaced learning could be incorporated within training for research students, added to study skills support, or investigated further by Psychology students.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga

While in Wagga Wagga, I had the opportunity to meet many of the team working on learning initiatives at Charles Sturt University (which must be one of the only universities in the world to have its own vineyard). Cassandra Colvin was my host, and we had some fascinating discussions, but I was also able to meet with many of the learning technology staff and the senior leadership team.

I also gave a presentation on learning analytics, which was more specific than my public talk the previous day and focused on the evidence for learning analytics and how to avoid failure.

Abstract

Where is the evidence for learning analytics? In particular, where is the evidence that it improves learning in practice? Can we rely on it? Currently, there are vigorous debates about the quality of research evidence in medicine and psychology, with particular issues around statistical good practice, the ‘file drawer effect’, and ways in which incentives for stakeholders in the research process reward the quantity of research produced rather than the quality. In this paper, we present the Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE) project’s Evidence Hub, an effort to relate research evidence in learning analytics to four propositions about learning analytics: whether they support learning, support teaching, are deployed widely, and are used ethically. Surprisingly little evidence in this strong, specific sense was found, and very little was negative (7%, N=123), suggesting that learning analytics is not immune from the pressures in other areas. We explore the evidence in one particular area in detail (whether learning analytics improve teaching and learners support in the university sector), and set out some of the weaknesses of the evidence available. We conclude that there is considerable scope for improving the evidence base for learning analytics, and set out some suggestions of ways for various stakeholders to achieve this.

Leave a comment

u¡magine – Wagga Wagga

After Melbourne, my next stop was the town of  Wagga Wagga, where Cassandra Colvin had invited me to talk about learning analytics.

I gave a public lecture at Riverina TAFE, which  explored the use of learning analytics and the role they may play in the future of learning. This event was organised by u!magine and was open to all educators in the Wagga area – from K-12 through to Higher Education – interested in using learning analytics to inform their practice.

Abstract

Learning analytics involve the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, in order to understand and optimise learning and the environments in which it occurs. Since emerging as a distinct field in 2011, learning analytics has grown rapidly, and institutions around the world are already developing and deploying these new tools. However, it is not enough for us to develop analytics for our educational systems as they are now – we need to take into account how teaching and learning will take place in the future. The current fast pace of change means that if, in 2007, we had begun developing learning analytics for 2017, we might not have planned specifically for learning with and through social networks (Twitter was only a year old), with smartphones (the first iPhone was released in 2007), or learning at scale (the term MOOC was coined in 2008). This talk will examine ways in which learning analytics could develop in the future, highlighting issues that need to be taken into account.

Leave a comment

Learning analytics at RMIT

prison gate

The RMIT analytics team is based in the old gaol!

After the LAK conference in Sydney, I was invited to RMIT University in Melbourne by Pablo Munguia to meet the team and talk about learning analytics.

The former OU pro-vice chancellor, Belinda Tynan, who took the lead on learning analytics at The Open University is now at RMIT, so it was really interesting to see how a similar implementation strategy is playing out at a different university. The priorities at RMIT are different – student retention is not a significant issue there – so their analytics are focused on students achieving their goals.

I gave a presentation to the team on the future of learning analytics, which complemented a presentation by my colleague, Bart Rienties, on the practicalities and successes of learning analytics implementation.

Abstract

Learning analytics involve the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, in order to understand and optimise learning and the environments in which it occurs. Since emerging as a distinct field in 2011, learning analytics has grown rapidly, and institutions around the world are already developing and deploying these new tools. However, it is not enough for us to develop analytics for our educational systems as they are now – we need to take into account how teaching and learning will take place in the future. The current fast pace of change means that if, in 2008, we had begun developing learning analytics for 2018, we might not have planned specifically for learning with and through social networks (Twitter was still in its infancy), with smartphones (the first iPhone was released in 2007), or learning at scale (the term MOOC was coined in 2008). By thinking ahead and by consulting with experts, though, we might have come pretty close by taking into account existing work on networked learning, mobile learning and connectivism. This talk will examine ways in which learning analytics could develop in the future, highlighting issues that need to be taken into account. In particular, the learning analytics community needs to work together in order to develop a strong evidence base grounded in both research and practice.

Leave a comment

Perfect Storm Utrecht

Sound sculptureWhile in Utrecht in February I also keynoted at the Perfect Storm. This innovative educational event is a collaborative conference designed to kickstart projects and ideas.

The organisers describe the event in this way: ‘The PerfectStorm 2018 is a unique concept called collaborative conference. Bring your team to kickstart your own innovation. Design Thinking, Learning Design and Leading Creativity collide in this energizing event where you work on your own goals, guided by international experts. Enjoy sharing learning journeys in campfire sessions where you experience a broad range of best practices, new tools and innovative insights.’

The Perfect Storm took  place in a working art school, with sculptures and art works to explore during the breaks (see picture for a sound sculpture by Dianne Verdonk that I enjoyed – sounds in the megaphone are transformed into vibrations in the body of the sculpture and thus transferred to the body of anyone lying on top of it.)

Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 16.33.08

Keynote abstract

Design thinking involves the creation of innovative solutions that address people’s needs. In the case of education, what are those needs? Are we educating people to be workers, citizens, good members of the community, rounded individuals or lifelong learners? Rebecca Ferguson, lead author of the Innovating Pedagogy series of reports, will talk about the challenges facing our learners, the problems we need to solve, and some of the pedagogies that offer a starting point.

Leave a comment

Utrecht: ATEE Winter Conference

Screen Shot 2018-03-01 at 10.31.00
Utrecht, with conference venue in distanceIn March, I enjoyed my time as keynote for the Association for Teacher Education in Europe (ATEE) Winter Conference in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The conference was held on February 15th and 16th and was organised by the Archimedes Institute from the HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht.

Keynote abstract

From educational radio and television, through virtual learning environments, to mobile devices – when we think of innovation in education, we tend to think of the technology used to deliver it. This technology has helped to extend access to education, but technology alone cannot bring about deep and sustained improvements in the quality of learning. The Innovating Pedagogy reports shift the emphasis towards innovations in pedagogy: identifying new forms of teaching, learning and assessment to guide educators. These innovations can be used to help learners deal with a changing world in which they need to make sense of increasing amounts of data and information, and make the most of their opportunities to make global connections. In her keynote, Rebecca Ferguson will talk about new pedagogies that can be put into practice in the classroom, the ideas that connect them and the skills that support them. Some of these approaches extend current practice, some personalise it, some enrich it and others explore new possibilities that have opened up in the past decade.

Leave a comment

South American visitors

Presentation slideIn conjunction with the BETT Show in London, CISCO sponsored over 50 educators and educational leaders from Brazil, Columbia and Peru to visit the UK and find out more about research and practice here.

The CISCO delegation spent the day at the OU on 26 January, finding out about subjects including teaching science at a distance, teaching teachers using social media, and learning analytics.

I gave a presentation on future directions for pedagogy and education, drawing on work on the Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE) project and the Innovating Pedagogy report series.

Leave a comment