Innovating Pedagogy 2013

Tweet relating to the reportCover of Innovating Pedagogy 2013Out today – the second in a series of reports from The Open University that provide a straightforward introduction to innovations in education and look at the implications of these innovations for the theory and practice of teaching, learning and assessment.

This second report, Innovating Pedagogy 2013, revisits four subjects covered in last year’s report – MOOCs, badges to accredit learning, learning analytics and seamless learning – and highlights six new pedagogies.

  • Crowd learning harnesses the local knowledge of many people to answer questions or address immediate problems.
  • Digital scholarship enhances scholarly practice through networked technologies.
  • Geo-learning uses the location detection of smartphones to provide context-based learning materials.
  • Learning from gaming exploits the power of digital games for education.
  • Maker culture describes the informal networks of people who share practical learning, motivated by fun and self-fulfilment.
  • Citizen inquiry fuses the creative knowledge building of inquiry-based learning with the mass civic engagement of volunteer activism.

The report has been written by a small group of academics in the Institute of Educational Technology and the Faculty of Mathematics, Computing and Technology at The Open University. To produce it, they compiled a long list of new educational terms, theories, and practices. They then pared these down to ten that have the potential to provoke major shifts in educational practice, particularly in post-school education. Lastly, they drew on published and unpublished writings to compile ten sketches of
new pedagogies that might transform education.

The report was written up in the Times Higher Education on 3 October 2013.

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  1. #1 by r3becca on June 17, 2014 - 9:42 am

    Sun Hongfei from the Open University of China (OUC) translated the report into Chinese in 2014.

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